Category: Lessons from PEPS

Connection: something magical borne of a friendship

Quinn screamed the whole car ride to our first PEPS meeting. She was inconsolable during the introductions and screeched through the birth stories. She flailed her arms and threw her little head back, she demanded to nurse countless times and then immediately jerked her head away, sputtering and furious. I bounced her, rocked her, shushed her, wrapped her, passed her…

Friends After Baby

  Having a baby, and especially being a stay-at-home mom (part-time, full-time, short- or long-term…), does interesting things to your social life. For example, to leave the house to meet up with a friend, I USED to breezily grab my purse, car keys and a pair of sunglasses. NOW, assuming my son is with me – I leave the house,…

Mama Drama and Humble Pie

When this mama drama infests these sites, it’s like a car wreck on the side of the road. Many people will anonymously drive by and observe what’s going on, say a little “glad it’s not me” prayer, and move along with their day. Very few will pull over and decide to get involved.

Staying Home

By Beth Morris *Originally published in May, 2013 on the blog Write as Rain (writeasrainblog.com). I recently updated my current job title on my Facebook page to “Mom/Project Manager at Home.” While this might sound like an overly official title for what most call stay-at-home-mom, I like it.  Why should what I’m doing now be made to sound any less…

Cheers – to Kicking Ourselves Out of the House

One thing I’ve learned through my own experience as a parent, and from the dozens of parents I’ve gotten to know through the PEPS groups I’ve been a part of – is everyone needs to feel connected, first and foremost, to their partner. You are the foundation of your family, and when you’re good, your kids are likely to be good, too. Kids just pick up on this sort of thing.

The art of letting parents talk

The key to asking open-ended questions is that it doesn’t assume that the parent you’re talking to plans to do x,y or z the same way you do, or even the same way that many or most parents do. It leaves space for the idea that there are many right ways to parent, and shows that you respect that parent enough to hear them out, whatever their plans may be.